Atlas Designed to Illustrate the Geography of the Heavens

http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Atlas-Geography_of_the_Heavens-Burritt-1833-01.jpg
http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Atlas-Geography_of_the_Heavens-Burritt-1833-02.jpg
Publication: 1833

The 18th and 19th century saw an exponential growth in the number of identified stars due to technological improvements. From ancient times until around 1600, the number of identified stars remained at around 1000. But by 1800, scientists had identified over 100,000 stars. American mathematician and astronomer Elijah Burritt published his atlas as a poor man's substitute for a celestial globe. Designed for teaching astronomy, the atlas illustrated stars visible to the naked eye.

Title

Atlas Designed to Illustrate the Geography of the Heavens

Date

Publication: 1833

Description

The 18th and 19th century saw an exponential growth in the number of identified stars due to technological improvements. From ancient times until around 1600, the number of identified stars remained at around 1000. But by 1800, scientists had identified over 100,000 stars. American mathematician and astronomer Elijah Burritt published his atlas as a poor man's substitute for a celestial globe. Designed for teaching astronomy, the atlas illustrated stars visible to the naked eye.

Rights

Public Domain

Format

Astronomical charts

Source

Sevier Oversize Collection, QB65 .B87 1833

Files

http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Atlas-Geography_of_the_Heavens-Burritt-1833-01.jpg
http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Atlas-Geography_of_the_Heavens-Burritt-1833-02.jpg

Collection

Citation

“Atlas Designed to Illustrate the Geography of the Heavens,” Gallery, accessed September 22, 2019, https://gallery.library.vanderbilt.edu/items/show/719.