An Observational Correlation between Stellar Brightness Variations and Surface Gravity

http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Q9_16ptRMS_vs_Range_vs_Teff_fin.jpg
Creation: 2013-08-22

This image is an example visualization from Vanderbilt's Filtergraph tool applied to NASA Kepler mission data. Each point represents a star in thedataset. The horizontal axis represents the amplitude of starlight "flicker" (or "hiss"), the vertical axis represents the overall amount of stellar light variation (or "loudness"), and the symbol size encodes the complexity of the stellar light signal (or "crackle"). Color encodes the stellar temperatures. Arrows are added annotations to guide the eye as to the temporal evolution of stars.

Title

An Observational Correlation between Stellar Brightness Variations and Surface Gravity

Date

Creation: 2013-08-22

Description

This image is an example visualization from Vanderbilt's Filtergraph tool applied to NASA Kepler mission data. Each point represents a star in thedataset. The horizontal axis represents the amplitude of starlight "flicker" (or "hiss"), the vertical axis represents the overall amount of stellar light variation (or "loudness"), and the symbol size encodes the complexity of the stellar light signal (or "crackle"). Color encodes the stellar temperatures. Arrows are added annotations to guide the eye as to the temporal evolution of stars.

Rights

Copyright; use considered fair according to the ARL Code of Best Practices in Fair Use

Format

Articles

Source

Online resource, available via: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v500/n7463/full/nature12419.html

Files

http://libexh.library.vanderbilt.edu/impomeka/2015-exhibit/Q9_16ptRMS_vs_Range_vs_Teff_fin.jpg

Citation

“An Observational Correlation between Stellar Brightness Variations and Surface Gravity,” Gallery, accessed October 13, 2019, https://gallery.library.vanderbilt.edu/items/show/999.