[Model of XML Encoding for Syriac Manuscripts]

3D-image_FULL.jpg
2016

This item contains a single image with three layered components. The first layer shows a page from a Syriac manuscript. The second layer is metadata provided for that manuscript to be understood online, and is expressed in XML encoding. The final layer is the visual display of that XML via the Syriaca.org website.

A student research group at Vanderbilt University, directed by Prof. David Michelson, has been working to transform 19th century Syriac manuscript catalogues into a new format for the world wide web. Each manuscript (bottom layer) is encoded in XML and then displayed as a webpage (top layer) on Syriaca.org. The encoding allows for the manuscript data to be stored in database with a number of “tags” which facilitate searching based on multiple criteria such as date, author, number of folia (pages), condition, title of texts, decorations, and previous owners. The completed project will produce a digital catalogue for the collection of over 1,000 Syriac manuscripts held by the British Library in London, England. This project is an example of how digital humanities projects combine methods from the sciences and humanities in order to preserve the past for the future.

Title

[Model of XML Encoding for Syriac Manuscripts]

Date

2016

Description

This item contains a single image with three layered components. The first layer shows a page from a Syriac manuscript. The second layer is metadata provided for that manuscript to be understood online, and is expressed in XML encoding. The final layer is the visual display of that XML via the Syriaca.org website.
A student research group at Vanderbilt University, directed by Prof. David Michelson, has been working to transform 19th century Syriac manuscript catalogues into a new format for the world wide web. Each manuscript (bottom layer) is encoded in XML and then displayed as a webpage (top layer) on Syriaca.org. The encoding allows for the manuscript data to be stored in database with a number of “tags” which facilitate searching based on multiple criteria such as date, author, number of folia (pages), condition, title of texts, decorations, and previous owners. The completed project will produce a digital catalogue for the collection of over 1,000 Syriac manuscripts held by the British Library in London, England. This project is an example of how digital humanities projects combine methods from the sciences and humanities in order to preserve the past for the future.

Language

English

Rights

Public domain

Format

3 data models

Source

Syriaca.org Website

Files

3D-image_FULL.jpg

Citation

Downing, Stephanie A., “[Model of XML Encoding for Syriac Manuscripts],” Gallery, accessed March 22, 2019, https://gallery.library.vanderbilt.edu/items/show/2562.